Sunday, May 11, 2008

Karma

PICHER, Oklahoma (CNN) -- Residents in three Midwestern states spent Mother's Day sifting through the wreckage of their homes, trying to recover from powerful storms that left at least 21 people dead.

The storm system killed at least 20 people in the Midwest and then continued into the South, killing one person in Georgia, officials said.


According to my sources, no gay pride parades were planned in the area when the tornadoes hit. Furthermore, pagans and members of the ACLU are reportedly "thin on the ground" in that particular part of the country. San Francisco and the Upper West Side of NY, however, remain completely unaffected by tornadoes.

10 comments:

baba durag said...

Pity. Now who they gonna blame?

watertiger said...

actually, Brooklyn got hit last year, remember?

Monica_A: Dammit! said...

Are you sure there were no gay homosexualing parades scheduled?

Ralphie said...

There must have been a gay couple in at least one of those states, probably not Georgia.

Diane said...

Are you sure? That pissed-off desert god doesn't make any mistakes.

steve simels said...

The obvious conclusion is that God is a bitch.

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Anonymous said...

Can't speak for the Upper West Side, but here in SF we are occasionally "affected" by moving earth. We attribute the condition not to the presence of any group, but rather the presence of Diane Feinstein.

Dprice said...

The Chicago suburb I live in extends benefits to the partners of all village employees. We also maintain a gay registry for couples. In 17 years I've lived here, we've never had a natural disaster.

Why is God so powerless?

IludiumPhosdex said...

As a matter of fact:

The day before the tornadoes hit Picher, there was a news item about the community being in a state of decline by virtue of its being a Superfund cleanup site thanks to years of lead- and zinc-mining waste and eflluvia translating into high rates of cancer.

In turn prompting the EPA to offer property buydowns to the remaining 800 or so residents in Picher.